Insights Into Teens

Insights Into Teens: Episode 180 "Perspectives on Parenting - Nurturing Them"

November 06, 2023 Madison and Joseph Whalen Season 5 Episode 180
Insights Into Teens
Insights Into Teens: Episode 180 "Perspectives on Parenting - Nurturing Them"
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Are you ready to crack the code of parenting and master the art of socializing your children? We've got an episode packed with insights and practical tips that will help you navigate this journey. Your hosts, Joseph and Madison Whalen, together with our special guest and seasoned parent, Michelle Whalen, invite you to join us as we shed light on how parents can effectively encourage their kids to socialize while respecting their comfort zones. We explore the positive and negative effects that a parent's involvement can have on a child's social behavior and the importance of setting a good example.

How can parents instill the important values of honesty, hard work, and respect in their children? We discuss this in depth, emphasizing the critical role of parents in shaping a child's character. Not only do we touch on this, but also the significance of attending to your children's educational needs. We believe that a parent's influence doesn't stop at the confines of the home but extends to their child's educational journey. 

But what about the schools? What role do they play in a child's upbringing? We compare the roles of parents and schools and stress the necessity of preparing our children for real-world experiences that go beyond academics. It's time to look at education more holistically and explore the benefits of different career paths while considering happiness in the equation. So grab a cup of coffee, settle in, and let's dive into a conversation that promises to be as enlightening as it is engaging!

An original podcast by a husband and wife team of self professed pop-culture geeks. It is a discussion about all things entertainment from movies and music to television and pop culture. We examine some of the more obscure aspects of the entertainment industry.

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Speaker 1:

Insightful Podcasts by Informative Hosts. Insights Into Things. Welcome to Insights Into Teens, a podcast series exploring the issues and challenges of today's youth. Your hosts are Joseph and Madison Whalen, a father and daughter team making their way through the challenges of the teenage years.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to Insights Into Teens. This is episode 180 Perspectives on Parenting and Top Challenges of Parenting. That's not at all a.

Speaker 3:

Not it, actually it's perspectives on parenting. Getting them ready.

Speaker 2:

Okay, whatever.

Speaker 3:

Hopefully you got the same script as me.

Speaker 2:

I have the questions. Alright, this is just from a couple ofhowever long ago.

Speaker 3:

it was Alright well it'll be interesting, if nothing else.

Speaker 2:

Anyway, I'm your host, madison Whalen, given a great intro so far, and my co-host today, joseph Whalen. Hi, this is why I don't do this stuff anymore.

Speaker 3:

A little out of practice. You want to do this, like you know, every 10 episodes.

Speaker 2:

And also our special guest for today, Michelle Whalen from Insights in Entertainment.

Speaker 3:

Hi Michelle.

Speaker 1:

Hi everyone.

Speaker 2:

How are you doing?

Speaker 1:

Sound like a special guest. It's Mom. We just had dinner. It wasn't. Like you know, I haven't seen you in a while, or anything.

Speaker 3:

That's true. It's been a while since we've been on the air though.

Speaker 2:

Well, yes, that is true. Alright, so how's everybody doing?

Speaker 3:

Fantastic.

Speaker 1:

Wonderful and you.

Speaker 2:

Good, not used to this, but we're working on it. And another year older, yeah, that's.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, look at that.

Speaker 2:

Ain't that nifty, am I right?

Speaker 3:

Pretty soon we're not going to be able to do Insights in the Teens anymore.

Speaker 2:

I still got a couple of years technically.

Speaker 3:

Well, that's good, so the show will continue for a little while.

Speaker 2:

But I'm still a teenager at 19,. Technically that's true, true.

Speaker 3:

And then we'll have to go out and dig out another teenager that can be on the show, or we'll be lying. Well, technically, you started the show at 12, so Right, yeah, technically we were lying from the beginning.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's a whole lot. A bunch of liars, Anyway. So today we're going to be doing another one of our perspectives on parenting. This is the third episode of this We've Done. It's kind of our big 10 episode margin topper off or segue into the next era of what our Insights in the Teens podcast are going to be about.

Speaker 3:

Kind of like a season arc.

Speaker 2:

Pretty much, yeah, and, like you said earlier today, we're going to be talking about a section from that we've been pulling from so far for the other episodes, which is getting them ready. So we're going to be going through various different questions relating to things of teaching kids to socialize and still in good behavior in them and looking after their educational needs. Since I do not have the right thing up, I do not have a good summary, so that is my best interpretation of what we've got so far.

Speaker 3:

That's good enough.

Speaker 2:

All right, but before we get started on the podcast, I'd like to invite the listening and viewing audience to subscribe to the podcast. You can find audio versions listed under Insights in the Teens. You can also find video and audio versions listed under Insights in the Things. I'd also like to invite you to give us your feedback on what we're talking about or give us your suggestions for show topics. You can email us at comments and insights into thingscom and links to all these and more on our website at wwwinsightsinthethingscom. Are we ready?

Speaker 3:

We are ready.

Speaker 2:

All righty, so start. Sorry, wrong button. Oh, we're just full of mistakes. I was almost. We're just full of mistakes today aren't we? Little bit of a lot of practice.

Speaker 3:

Little bit of a lot of practice.

Speaker 2:

It's been a while but, starting us off, we're going to be talking. I'm going to be asking both of you questions about teaching kids how to socialize, so I'm going to ask this to you, father.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

So is it the job of a parent to teach their kids how to socialize?

Speaker 3:

I don't know if it's the job of the parent. I think kids for the most part will socialize where they're comfortable. I think parents have the responsibility of kind of setting the example and teaching kids the probably the cautious way to socialize you know the dangers of it, how to do it right and encouraging I think that's probably a better term is it's a parent's job to encourage you to socialize, but within your comfort zone. I think.

Speaker 2:

All right, that's fair. Mommy, you want to add anything on that?

Speaker 1:

I would probably agree for the most part with that. I think, you know, nowadays you have a lot of kids that do homeschooling, so there's not as much socializing for some people, but a lot of the homeschoolers actually have their own school system in some respects so that they can have the kids socialize. So back in the day whenever you heard that somebody you know was homeschooled, it kind of meant that they didn't know how to act in public or didn't know how to act, you know, with other people because they were never around other people, where now homeschooled kids actually probably get more interaction because not only are they're in a different type of environment, so they are being able to socialize more. So I think it is important to you know, for the parents to make sure that their child is in some sort of environment to be able to socialize.

Speaker 2:

All right, fair enough. I'll lead the next question to you, mommy. Do or do you not feel kids knowing how to socialize is important, and why, or why not?

Speaker 1:

Oh, absolutely, it's very important because it's how you function, you know, day to day in the world. Fortunately, nowadays so much can kind of be done in isolation. Unfortunately we found that out during the pandemic that people didn't need to necessarily go to work. Now, having all of the technology that you have where you could video call with somebody, FaceTime or Zoom or whatever, you don't need to necessarily physically socialize, but you still have some sort of skill set that you need to be able to communicate and socialize, even virtually. So I think it's just important in general to be able to, you know, not have anxiety when you want to go get something to eat and you need to go order from a restaurant or pick something up at the store. There's all that social interaction. But there are times, you know, again, because of the pandemic and everything, there's so much that became virtual or curbside, where you don't have to, where there are people that have the anxiety of having the social interaction, where it kind of helped them to still be kind of part of things without having it. But I think it's a skill set that everybody you know should have.

Speaker 2:

Okay, do not at all feel called out by that. Anyway, I'll turn the next question over to you, father. Can kids gain enough social skills on their own through things like school and interacting with others with a little parental influence?

Speaker 3:

You know, if I'm going back to when I was a kid, I would say absolutely. My parents had very little influence on my social upbringing. I'd say we, you know, did it all of ourselves. You know, my parents, like my parents weren't the helicopter parents. They weren't hovering over me, they weren't part of the PTA, they weren't the soccer moms. None of that stuff existed at the time. So as a kid, we did everything ourselves. From a social standpoint, we got home from school. You know, if you had homework, you finish your homework and then you were out playing until it was dark and you had to come in at that point in time. You did it through school because you made friends with everyone at school and there was a very different environment at the time, like you unfortunately nowadays there. There are too many things out there now that are a danger to kids, so parents tend to be overly protective these days and as a result, you get the creation of play dates. You know we didn't have play dates as a kid. If I wanted to hang out with my friends I'd get on the phone call and see if they were there. I'd go over to their house. You know, in the neighborhood that I lived in it was a. It was a, not a gated community, but it was a closed community and and in that it wasn't on any major roads. So the whole house, the whole community itself, was about one square mile. So if I wanted to hang out with my friends I'd either go to my best friend who was on the next street over, or I'd walk across town for five minutes to go to see the kids that were over there. So there was nothing that kept you in the house. We didn't have technology, we weren't glued to our phones or anything like that. So you had to go out and play with people and make friends because there was no substitute. You know, you had three channels on on showing my age here, but you had three channels on on TV unless you were rich enough to have cable, and then you had like 15 channels. So there wasn't anything at home to do. I didn't have video games. You didn't have computers. When I was a kid, you had toys and you played with your friends with toys or you'd go out and play sports or something like that. So my parents had almost nothing to do with my socializing. So the fact that if it was up to my mom, I probably wouldn't have had any friends, because she didn't let anybody over the house. She hated having people over the house because she didn't want people making a mess at the house. So today it's very different though, and I think today there are so many things at at at home that keep kids from being social. Ironically, social media is one of them. You know, people think social media is a social activity and it's not it's. It's the exact opposite. So, as a result, parents today are organizing kids in, you know, play groups or whatever to try and get them to socialize more, because we have to get you ready to interact with society as an adult and then if, if you're not going to do it yourself, then the parents have to at least put some effort into that.

Speaker 2:

That's fair enough. The next question goes to you, mommy. What methods do you feel are best in getting kids to socialize?

Speaker 1:

Well, I think it helps if there's some sort of common interest. So, you know, for kids to to either join a sport or do dance or some sort of club, some sort of activity. I think that always helps because then you have that, that common bond versus, hey, I'm into video games and I'm into baseball, but I don't like video games and I don't like baseball. You'll, you might have a conflict and then it might make you actually not even want to to socialize. So I think that's probably a good start. You know, besides school, I think going to school or being, you know, with kids your own age is a great way to kind of start the socializing. And then, if you see that there's some sort of you know issue where you know maybe they're not socializing enough, maybe they're not getting along with people, maybe trying to find a group where you know they would kind of feel that that they belong.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense. Do you want to weigh in on this daddy?

Speaker 3:

No, I think mommy covered that topic pretty well.

Speaker 2:

Alrighty. Next question goes to you then Should certain social activities be limited to different age groups? If so, which ones?

Speaker 3:

None come to mind immediately, but I'm sure there are certain ones that are age-appropriate. Certain things require certain resources. You know, if you want to go to the mall, the mall is only going to allow a certain age group to be there unsupervised. If you want to go to the movies, you need transportation, you need money, so there's logistics around that, right. You just want to hang out with your friends? No, that shouldn't be any age group. You're going to watch TV or play video games, or play board games, so anything that's there probably would be age-specific to the actual activity itself, and it would be less dependent on the socializing aspect, though, than it would be what the actual activity I think would be.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense. Anything to say on that? No, I think that was okay. All right, mommy. The next question is for you. Okay, what kind of impact do you feel that you've had on my social life?

Speaker 1:

I don't know, I hope a positive one. While you weren't in any sort of clubs or anything up until high school, you did do the before and after care, which that was kind of. Not that it was necessarily a club, it was something that was needed because of going and working in the office and the hours of school and things like that. But that kind of became a way for you to socialize with a vast array of kids that weren't necessarily all within your age group. When you started you were one of the younger kids and then you became the older kids. So you got to kind of see the transition of being the kid that oh, I don't have that much homework, I want to go play, I want to go play to being the older kid that had more homework and you got annoyed at the younger kids who just wanted to play because you still had homework that you needed to do. But I think you also kind of found your niche of okay, I kind of like being the older kid and hanging with the younger kids and kind of being the mom of the group in a way. I think that kind of became your niche in a lot of cases, because even with the kids in the neighborhood, you're one of the older ones when you would get together and do stuff and you kind of organize and you're kind of like the kid wrangler Come on, let's do this, let's go here, let's do that. Or even when you were in marching band, if somebody needed a band aid, wait, I got one. Oh, you're new fan, you're hot, there's that. Oh, you were the one that was taken care of everybody. So I think that kind of helped to put you in that. I know I kind of look back and I kind of have regrets that we didn't get you more involved with things when you were younger and unfortunately it was time constraints where there were activities that started at four o'clock in the afternoon but because of our working schedules we couldn't do that, so you weren't able to do dance or brownies or Girl Scouts or things like that.

Speaker 3:

I like brownies.

Speaker 1:

Who doesn't. So I kind of regret that and I wonder how things would have changed if you had been able to do those things. Would you be different socially than you are now?

Speaker 2:

That's fair.

Speaker 1:

But I don't think you have any regrets for it. I don't think you ever go. You know, I really wish. Yeah, not really no, you're kind of happy, like being where you are. And again, I think part of it is also because we went through COVID, you know, and that was when you were in middle school. So that was another like informative year timeframe that kind of got compressed, where that should have been more getting out hanging out with friends doing things. But nobody was doing any of that. But you have this nice little core group of friends, which is important. I think that everybody have that. So you might not always be able to get together with everybody, but it's like all right, well, do you want to do something? All right, we'll do something this week, and it's maybe not everybody all at once, but okay, so this day you hang out with this person and this day you get to hang out with that one. So I feel that I kind of all right, we did a good job. She's not the person that's sitting at home, not talking to anybody, not communicating with anybody, not hanging out with anybody. So I think we did good so far. Fair enough, just need to learn how to order food on your own, that's all.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we're not going to talk about that, all right, so the next question is going to go out to you. So you mentioned before how a parent can kind of influence a kid in the terms of them being social. So do you believe that a parent could cause a child to be less social?

Speaker 3:

Yes, there are certainly a number of different ways that a parent can have that impact on a child, and sometimes it's not a negative impact. Sometimes, if you're someone who is more interested in going out and socializing than you are in doing the things that you need to be responsible about doing schoolwork or chores or whatever having a parent make you less social is a positive. The negatives tend to come in with parents who live vicariously through their kids, and you see this a lot with sports. You have parents who want to relive their youth through their kids, and so they get them in every sports event or doing traveling teams or doing tournaments, and their entire life is consumed with going out and doing these sports, not because the kid really wants to do it, but because the parent wants to do it. And that's where it gets dangerous and that's where you kind of have to be careful.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you also mentioned the idea of helicopter parents, and do you think a helicopter parent could also cause a child to be less social in a more negative light?

Speaker 3:

I think a helicopter parent who's overly cautious and unfortunately in today's society it's not unjustified to be overly cautious of your children but a helicopter parent could really put too much fear in their kids and transfer their own fear to their kids and have them make them be less social as a result. So yes, there's definitely that negative effect.

Speaker 2:

So, really, depending on what type of parent you can be, either you live vicariously through your kids, your helicopter parent, or there's some other combination of it. A parent can always cause a child to be less social, in a positive light, but also in a more negative light.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely so. There are different examples of bad parents out there that can cause this type of problem to happen. You know you have parents that aren't involved at all with their kids and, as a result, their kids are overly social. They wind up getting into groups that are a bad influence on them. They wind up getting into substance abuse issues, and parents should be doing something about their kids, but they're not, and they allow their kids to basically run free with no constraints on them at all, and that's not a good thing either. All right.

Speaker 2:

A final question in this section goes to you, mommy Are there right and wrong ways of teaching your kid how to be social, and what would you say they are?

Speaker 1:

Well, yeah, there's. You know I think you need to. You know, have your child interact. You know out in the real world, you know, and not keep them. You know at home all the time and you know children should be. You know, seen and not heard. You know because you see it time and time again, where you know a parent has their child out, you know, shopping or at a restaurant or what's so funny, nothing Okay, and they are totally misbehaving because they don't know how to act, because you know the parent never took the child out in public, so the child has no idea how to act socially, like what's the right way? You know to act where. You know, daddy and I, when you were a baby, you went out, you did things. If you cried, you know we took care of it. Or you know there was really only one time ever that we actually left someplace because you, we couldn't get you to stop crying. It was just you were upset about something. You either didn't feel well or whatever, and unfortunately you were a baby so you couldn't tell us what was wrong. You know we did all the things. We changed you, we fed you, we burped you. We did this. You know all the things. We beat you. No, we didn't do that. You put the pillow over your head. No, we didn't do that either. But you know, we went through all the things and it just got to the point. So we didn't want to be that parent where we were ruining everybody else's time. But then there were multiple times where we would go places and people would compliment us on how well-behaved you were and how polite you were and that was a testament to us raising you to be, you know, socially aware and a polite, well-behaved child. So there's right ways to do it and there's wrong way, and you know. But then the parent themselves also have to be, you know, a well-behaved person, because some parents themselves aren't, you know, well-behaved. So it's kind of hard to teach your child how to be well-behaved if you don't know how to behave.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think one of the keys is that the parents have to be socially competent. If the parents aren't socially competent and the child's being raised by parents who have no social skills, the child's not going to get any social skills because, one, there's no one to set the example and, two, there's no perceived need to have them in the first place.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense.

Speaker 3:

So that's one of the I think overriding factors of that.

Speaker 2:

All right, I think this segment went well.

Speaker 3:

I think it did as well.

Speaker 2:

All right, we'll take a quick break and then we'll move on to the next segment.

Speaker 3:

Okay, so don't fully host the whole show.

Speaker 1:

Insights into Entertainment, a podcast series taking a deeper look into entertainment and media. Our husband and wife team of pop culture fanatics are exploring all things, from music and movies to television and fandom. We'll look at the interesting and obscure entertainment news of the week. We'll talk about Theme Park and pop culture news. We'll give you the latest and greatest on pop culture conventions. We'll give you a deep dive into Disney, star Wars and much more. Check out our video episodes at youtubecom backslash insights into things, our audio episodes at podcastinsightsintoentertainmentcom, or check us out on the web at insightsintothingscom.

Speaker 2:

Welcome back to Insights Into Teens. Today we're on our Perspectives on Parenting. We're talking about getting them ready, and now I'm going to ask some questions about instilling good behavior in them. I'm being children, by the way. All right, to start us off with the first question. We'll go to you, dad. So what forms of good behavior should a parent try to instill in their child?

Speaker 3:

Without getting overly verbose, I think the basics you want your kids to be honest, you want your kids to be hardworking and you want your kids to treat other people decent. I think if you can get those three, you know qualities, instilling your kids everything else kind of falls in line at that point in time and keep your expectations realistic. You know you're not going to, you're not going to turn your kid into a philanthropic genius overnight, but you have to demonstrate to them these, these skills and these qualities. You have to be honest, you have to treat them with respect and make sure that you're kind to them and kind to others. You know, one of the one of the things that my mother always instilled in me was her compassion. She had this overwhelming compassion for everyone. There wasn't anyone my mother ever turned away who needed help. She might not have had enough food on the table for the family, but if somebody needed help and she could take somebody in and give them a roof over their head and and a warm meal and get them back on their feet, she would do it in an instant. And that leaves a lasting impression on kids when you see your parents act in noble ways like that, I think.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense. Any other traits you'd like to add? Or you think he kind of covered it.

Speaker 1:

No, I would say just raise your kids to be decent human beings. That's, I think you know.

Speaker 3:

If you if they're human beings, well you know for the aliens out there, we don't want to discriminate.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but I think that's that's the top level. You know, if you were raising to be a decent human being, everything else kind of just falls into place. Falls into place.

Speaker 2:

All right, that's fair. Turning it over to you, mommy, okay. How do you feel the actions of the parent can affect how good-natured or well-behaved their child is?

Speaker 1:

Well, I think that that comes into play where you're setting that example. If daddy and I are you, you see that we are, you know, walking down the street and we see somebody that's homeless and we're like, screw them and you know, and we, you know, kick over their cup or something, we're all jerky or whatever. You're going to be like, all right, well, I have to be a jerk to everybody, or in some cases, maybe that would even make you not want to be like that because you realize that's the bad example. But I think when you see, you know, hopefully, the good example that the parents are setting, that that makes the child want to set that good example. But then again, you know, you have parents that go out of their way to have good examples but the child just doesn't see it or has some sort of issue where, no, I'm not going to be like that, I want to be the exact opposite of my parents. So as parents, you kind of hope for the best, that you do enough to show what's right and wrong, enough for your child to make that own, you know, their own decision.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because you can't always guarantee that the kid's going to really even be listening to your example or doing the exact opposite.

Speaker 3:

Sometimes people are just rotten to the core.

Speaker 2:

You can't surpass that Right. Fair enough, all right, turning this over to you, daddy. Is this something that can be entrusted by outside forces like school or peers, to be taught to kids?

Speaker 3:

I don't. Yes, it can, and so much as these types of behaviors can be instilled through discipline. And you can even go so far as to say the military. You know you've got a lot of kids that come out of high school who don't know who they are, don't know what they want to be, and they're wild and dangerous and they wind up in the military. And the military puts gives them that discipline, that structure that they need because they might not be getting it at home. So, yes, there's a place that schools can serve as a tool to that end. Is it their responsibility? Should parents abdicate their responsibility to the schools to do that? Absolutely not. This type of behavior, behavioral training or learning has to happen at home. And when parents forgo that and parents decide that they're not responsible for teaching their kids how to behave properly, then you run into all kinds of societal problems and the kids run into all kinds of, you know, disciplinary problems, academic problems, legal problems, and I think that's where a good portion and I hate to put all the blame on the parents, but I think a lot of the crime that you have in society today, a lot of the cruelty and the hatred that you see in today's society. I want to put that blame on parents, because I think if you had better parenting, better mentoring at home and parents who took the time and exercised the responsibility to raise your kids right, society would be a better place today. All too often we want to abdicate that responsibility and say, well, the school system should do that, or the government should do that, or go into the military, we're going to send you to the military. No, you need to be a good parent. That's really what it boils down to. And a good parent's primary concern is one protect your children and two, make sure they become productive citizens in society. And if you can't make sure those two things happen, then you failed as a parent. Now, sometimes protecting your kid is hard to do in today's society because of people who have failed the system, but no one has any excuse for not raising your kids right. You can go through the motions and, like we said, you know the kids might not take it and they just might be rotten to the core. There are literally people out there that are just bad people. But if the parents didn't put the effort in, you can't blame the child. You have to blame the parents at that point. So I can't say that that schools are responsible for this. Schools can do this, your peers can do this. Peers become mentors. You know as you, as you grow older, so they can do it and they should do a certain extent. Do it because it's the right thing to do, but ultimately it has to start with the parents.

Speaker 2:

That's understandable, all right. The next question is for you, mommy In what ways can a parent instill both good and bad behaviors in children?

Speaker 1:

I think that's by whatever example you're showing your child kind of the whole. If you go out to a restaurant and you totally become a Karen in, you know, I want to see the manager and this is horrible and you know, and you're constantly complaining because nothing is is done right, when you're going over and above and and showing that to your child, your child's going to see thing and think either, oh, this is the way I have to be, I have to be a jerk in order to get what I want. Or your child might say you know what? That was really kind of kind of wrong. Maybe I shouldn't be like that. So you always hope for, for the best. But I think also showing you know the right example hey, if something went wrong, this is the way you take care of it. You don't just go off the handle like that. Or you know how to deal with anger or how to deal with something that goes wrong, and you know so that you don't have that anxiety or the issues of having that bad behavior learned. You know you kind of go okay, this is how I deal with it and I move on and everything is better. So but then there are parents that they think the way that they're raising their kids is right, when other parents would look at them and go, no, you shouldn't be that way, you shouldn't be like that. You know that's. That's one of the things where kids don't learn how to be a bully from other kids. They learn it from you. Know other adults that then those kids would learn it from that. You know you don't have the kids sitting around and a kid just decides to say something mean to somebody else. They said it because they heard somebody older or saw it on TV or something. So the parents need to kind of teach, you know. Okay, this is the right way to do it, this is the wrong way to do it. And again it kind of goes back to you know the schools and things like that where, yes, it's not the school's responsibility. The parents have to set that foundation. But the other part of it too is when you think about how many hours a day you're in school. You're actually in school and with those people longer than you are with your own family. So while it's, it's almost like a co-op of sorts you have to have the help from the school, not saying that it's there 100% their responsibility. But again, if you, if the parents lay that foundation, then everything else builds up from it. Kind of like, you know, if I teach you to be a decent human being, everything else should come, you know, come naturally and should be you know. Teaching you everything, oh okay. Well, if I think, all right, decent human being, would I do this or would I do this? No, this makes sense. Doing that would be the bad thing, and hopefully then it kind of makes the rest of the lessons go smoothly.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense. All right. Next question is for you, Father.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I get promoted again.

Speaker 2:

So is teaching? Mr Whale, this question is for you, anyway, that's right. Anyway, is teaching nothing about good or bad behavior to children something to make a deal over or not?

Speaker 3:

That's a tough question. There are. There's an argument to be made to curb what you're teaching your kids when it comes to certain things you don't. Kids are developing, their brains are still developing. So if you impose your fears on kids and you try to teach them about some of the terrible things that happen you know, talk about current events. Now You've got the, the, the war in Gaza. Right now You've got the war in Ukraine. There's a lot of things the COVID experience there's a lot of serious things that go on in the world that are anxiety inducing, and while you want kids to learn from these things and mature from them and take something positive away from them, in trying to get to that positive outcome, you can very easily overwhelm a kid's senses and you can very easily scare them and and scar them with the imagery that you see on TV and the repeated atrocities that are happening. So when it comes to stuff like that, there's an argument to be made to tone it down. You know not not do away with it entirely, because kids are going to see this stuff on the news, they're going to hear about it, friends are going to talk about it and they're going to have questions and they're going to need guidance to understand what these things mean and how it affects them and so forth, but you don't want to throw them, you know, into the fire and give them everything. So there's a certain level of discretion. I think that's involved in that, that parents really need to understand their kids, and this is this is part of going back and being a good parent. It's not just about setting an example, it's about understanding the audience and it's about knowing what kind of message is best received, and sometimes dwelling on some of the negative things or even being overly optimistic sets the wrong tone. So I think parents have to understand their kids. You have to respect your kids and and you have to talk to your kids. Every kid is different and the only way you're going to know how to present information and lessons to your kid is to get to know them, and sometimes that requires a certain amount of discretion to make sure that you're not over saturating them with positive or negative, I think.

Speaker 2:

That's fair. All right for a bit of personal experience. Mommy, what have you done to instill good behaviors in me? What?

Speaker 1:

have you done? I locked you in a closet.

Speaker 3:

no, what didn't you do?

Speaker 1:

I don't know what didn't I do, I think.

Speaker 3:

The beatings will continue until you're. I'm so moral and pretty.

Speaker 1:

I don't know. I, for the most part, you were a really good kid. You're still a good kid. Like we happen, we never really went through Like I can look back at so far in the last 17 years and there really hasn't been the oh my god. Do you remember this time when?

Speaker 3:

you know, whatever I do, yeah, I remember.

Speaker 1:

But I don't. I don't know if it's because I blocked it out, like am I not remembering things you know? Like obviously we had ups and downs, especially going like everybody going through puberty, you know, your emotions go out of whack, and but because we talk about it and I think that's actually been very helpful, I think the fact that we have this understanding between all of us for the most part, you know, there are obviously things that you don't want to talk to daddy about because it's, you know, a girl thing, a female thing, you know.

Speaker 3:

And daddy's very grateful for that Right.

Speaker 2:

Or you're more empathetic than him, right, or that that?

Speaker 3:

too, I'm empathetic.

Speaker 1:

Not always Sure we'll get out of that, but I think because we've always had that open communication where daddy knows a whole lot more about female reproduction than he ever wanted to learn, but I think that was helpful. It wasn't well, go and talk to your mother about this. I don't want to know about this, you know, and I think that also helped. So when the mood swings hit, he understood.

Speaker 3:

Daddy knew to bring chocolate home Right.

Speaker 1:

And when you, when you brought chocolate home, everything was right with the world and it was like oh yeah, so that probably been, you know, our biggest hurdle in terms of that. The other you know thing is you know schoolwork and school grades and the biggest hurdle there is getting you to believe in yourself. Really, we're not there yet.

Speaker 2:

So we're discussing that in a minute, so we can hold off on that for the time being, I think it's just.

Speaker 1:

You know it's been. You know there's always that little hurdle that we have, but we talk things out and I think that's the biggest thing is that we talk about it and we communicate. And if it's something I don't want to talk about it now, okay, we don't talk about it now but we'll talk about it later. And we talk things through and sometimes it doesn't make sense when we're talking about it, but then it's kind of like you have that epiphany of oh okay, this kind of makes sense now. All right, I see your point. I don't really believe what you're saying, but it does make sense and hopefully at some point I'll believe you. You know that you say you know what it is and I think you realize that we have your best interest at heart. We want you to succeed and whatever we, you know, can do for you, we will.

Speaker 2:

All right, I think that's you know. Solid Thanks, I'm sorry I'm, I don't know. I'm starting to lose it, sorry, all right, so the last question will go over for this segment. Uh, leaning towards you, father.

Speaker 1:

Mr Whalen.

Speaker 2:

Mr Whalen, um, do you feel instilling good behavior in kids is a more difficult task for certain parents?

Speaker 3:

Um, yes, there are parents who don't exhibit the behavior that they want their kids to exhibit, and when that happens, the parents come across as hypocrites. My parent my father, was that way. My father expected a certain level of behavior if you were out in public or if you were at home with family, and my father expected respect. He was big on demanding respect and unfortunately, you can't demand respect. Respect is something that's earned, and the way that my father treated us was on a level, several levels below, where he treated perfect strangers and, as a result, there was very little respect that I can have for him. So when that sort of expectation is there and you as a parent can't deliver on it yourself, it's very difficult for that parent to dictate how you should behave. That's why I think the most important lesson are lessons your parents teach you through their example. If your parents are decent people, if they're respectful, if they have pride in you and self-confident in you, those things transfer down to you. Unfortunately, so do their negative traits. If your parents lack ambition, or if they're lazy, or if they're disrespectful or they insult people or they're negative, those, those traits transfer down to the kids as well. So I think a parent can't demand or expect any more of their kid than they're willing to do themselves, because the kids are not going to respect you at that point in time and, if anything, that's going to cause your kids to rebel against you, and that in and of itself is a lesson.

Speaker 2:

That is fair. I think that was a good way to end this. All right, so we will be back after a short break, and when we do, we're going to be talking about looking after your kid's educational needs.

Speaker 3:

All right.

Speaker 2:

We'll be right back.

Speaker 1:

Insights into Entertainment, a podcast series taking a deeper look into entertainment and media. Our husband and wife team of pop culture fanatics are exploring all things, from music and movies to television and fandom. We'll look at the interesting and obscure entertainment news of the week. We'll talk about Theme Park and pop culture news. We'll give you the latest and greatest on pop culture conventions. We'll give you a deep dive into Disney, star Wars and much more. Look at our video episodes at youtubecom backslash insights into things, our audio episodes at podcastinsightsintoentertainmentcom, or check us out on the web at insightsintothingscom.

Speaker 2:

Welcome back to insights into teens. Today, on Perspectives on Parenting, we're looking at getting them ready, and now we're going to talk about looking after your kid's educational needs. So to keep with the order, mommy, the first question is for you. So what do you feel are some of the most important educational needs of a child?

Speaker 3:

Read and write and rhythm.

Speaker 1:

Being sure that they get a good education is probably the biggest thing. Obviously, everybody learns differently, so you have to make sure that your child is in an environment where they can excel. I think any child can excel. It just is a matter of are they being taught the right way, because everybody learns different ways, so what works for one child might not work for another child. So I think that's a big thing is knowing where your child's limitations are. What do they excel in, what do they need help in, and to try and help them navigate that so that they can succeed.

Speaker 2:

All right, that's fair. Want to comment on any of that?

Speaker 3:

Nope, I think she's spot on there.

Speaker 2:

Woohoo, alrighty, right answer. Next question is for you, then Should there be a line between what parents have to teach their kids and what they should learn in school, something I feel like is kind of put in question a lot in the modern day.

Speaker 3:

So oh, absolutely, and I think my take on it is parents should teach their kids wisdom and schools should teach the kids knowledge. So you learn book knowledge and your math, your sciences, your languages all that comes from school, and I'm perfectly fine with that. How to use that now, how to use that knowledge, is what is wisdom, right. So then your parents teach you that how to, how to utilize the abilities that you gain from school, when they utilize them, and how best to put them to use the benefits society. That's what your parents should be teaching you to do. I think schools can't do that. And schools can't do that because school's job is not to do that. Schools job is to dump knowledge into you, teach you the subjects, and when schools try to teach you the moral side of those things, that's where they run in the problems, because schools are, or are, institutions of the state, and the state itself is, by its very nature, biased. I think parents, who it's their responsibility to raise productive members of society, should be the ones that are teaching their kids how to use that knowledge and how to interact in society, how schools can maintain the control of that knowledge and teaching of that knowledge with the oversight of parents. Parents should have control over the knowledge that you get. You know, parents shouldn't abdicate teaching kids about history, and I'm talking real history, not watered down history that make people uncomfortable. You know, history is history and that's what you should be taught. Even if some of the subjects may be sensitive or uncomfortable or may not hold a certain light to individuals or institutions in this country, it's history and it's worth learning. You know your sciences are the same thing. Let the parents be the ones to teach kids the intricacies of how that knowledge is then used for the betterment of society, and keep the schools out of the raising of the kids. They should be the teaching the kids.

Speaker 2:

All right, I definitely think that's fair. So this question kind of goes along with that and despite that we haven't gotten entirely your opinion on the full matter. I still think it would be good to get part of your perspective on this, mommy. So, due to more neglectful or restrictive parenting, should schools be required to teach a bit more about sensitive topics?

Speaker 1:

Well, I think, well, I don't think it's the school's responsibility, it's someone's responsibility, and I think that's where you kind of have to you know the school kind of gauge, where you know something might be lacking and where you know a teacher should reach out to the parent saying, hey, did you know such and such was going on with your child? Because in some cases the parent might not know because you know, maybe when the child is at home they act, you know one way, but yet when they go to school they're a completely different person, and especially if it's a bad behavior or something along those lines. So you know, again, they're going to school to learn and to get that knowledge. But again, like I had said, kids are in school far more hours than they are at home. You know, during the week, you know. And then, of course, a view of parents that are divorced, where then their time is even more split between you know different parents or whatever theirthe parents work schedule might be. So I don't want to say that you know the school needs to be surrogate parents, but again, it's a cooperative between you know the school, or whatever education, or if it's a club or something that you know a child is involved with. Hopefully there's some sort of advisor that is seeing something that maybe the parent's not seeing, that they can at least bring it to the parent's attention and say, hey, listen, we realize you know this is going on. Did you even know about it? Do you even, you know, realize that this is an issue and kind of go from there?

Speaker 2:

That's fair. All right, turning it over to you, mr Whalen. Do teens educational needs include more than just academics?

Speaker 3:

Absolutely, and I think we've touched on, I think, one of the most significant aspects of this when we talked about socializing and social skills. In the first segment, socializing isn't something that's in the book, right? You don't. You don't take a course on how to be social. Social interactions happen as a byproduct of being in a school with multiple kids and adults who are your teachers or your counselors or stuff. So there's more that happens. There's more information and knowledge that's imbued on you than is what's in the text books. So, yes, I absolutely agree with that. You can take that a step past that to nutrition and physical education. You know the basic health understandings. You know learning your information to learn to drive. You know stuff like that. There's. There's so much that happens in school that's not just academic related. That's important for kids growth. Creativity is another one you know. Even though it's considered an academic activity, your ability to express yourself creatively is something that's nurtured in school. That's really not an academic. You don't get graded on whether or not you can draw a pretty picture or not, but your ability to express yourself through that way is something that's nurtured in school as well. So definitely more than just academics.

Speaker 2:

All right, we'll move the next question to you, mommy. So what topics do you feel schools need to prioritize more or add to get kids ready for the real world?

Speaker 1:

Well, I think now you know a class that you'll actually have later this year your personal finance class. I think that we never had in a high school really, I think, unless you were a business major or you know taking business classes is how do you even balance a checkbook? How do I pay bills? How do I, you know, get car insurance? These are things that you know you're going to need to learn how to do. So I'm kind of, you know, the one thing I kind of wish you did have was, I know, when I was in middle school and we started having these electives and things, homeac was one of them. It was basic cooking, basic sewing. We also did woodshop and other things. So you kind of got a little taste of that and that was something where now, if you wanted to take a cooking class, you could, but with all of your other classes that you have, you know, for engineering and stuff, you don't have that space available. But I think something like that should be something that that's taught, just basic. You know everyday survival of you, know how to do laundry and things like that. Not necessarily that it needs to be a class, because, again, that should be something that you know that's done at home, but I think if your parents aren't ones that like to cook or know how to cook, I think if you were in an environment with your friends on how to cook, you'd have more fun learning it, where you know there are some people that that have fun cooking with their family If their family likes to cook. There are some families that don't like to cook or have relatives that do cook, so I think that would be something. I'm surprised they've gotten away from that and added all these other things, because the other thing too is, while it's great that you can end up graduating high school and have all of these college credits, there are some kids that you know end up having like double majors in high school now, where they're graduating high school already with an associate and it's like OK. So now what do you do? You're? You're still only 18 years old. You still have a lot of learning to still do. What's that piece of paper going to do? Are you really ready for the real world? Maybe you are, maybe you're not. So I think in some cases there's more pressure on kids your age than when, you know, daddy and I went to school, but yet I think also, you guys have more advantages because there's more information out there, but I think in a lot of cases it's almost information overload too. So it's kind of like a double edged sword, where you have it better in some cases, but I think you're kind of lacking in others because there's so much more out there to do. You know, like, some of the classes you're taking are things that I took, I couldn't take until college. And it's funny because I remember having this same conversation with my parents when I was in eighth grade, and what I was learning they didn't learn until college as well, and I was actually using their college textbook to help me with a report. So it's, you know, I get to now see that kind of full circle of oh well, back in my day I didn't do that until I went to college, or I went to a trade school, and now it's oh, I'm doing that in seventh grade, so yeah, so I think that's kind of where you know again, double edged sword. I think there's a lot that should be taught, but then there's a lot that you're being taught that somebody would have had to go to college for. So Fair enough, all right. Now we get to the college questions. Awesome.

Speaker 3:

All right, first.

Speaker 1:

Of them goes to you, daddy. Should parents be the ones fully responsible for sending?

Speaker 2:

their kids to college?

Speaker 3:

Absolutely not Somebody else should pay for it, and if so who. Please write us a check. No, and you know what. It's funny that I was thinking about this question. The college boards agree, and that's why the college boards don't just look at your academic transcript. They look at the clubs that you're in. They look at the charity work that you do. They look at who you are. They try to look at who you are as a person. They look at personality, they look at everything, and the person that you become isn't the person that you are on your test score sheets, on your CVE. It's the person who is in that afterschool club or the person who volunteers at the soup kitchen or at the animal shelter. These are all the various different things that help you get to college and put you through college. Now, that's just talking about the personality and the morality, the character development side of things. But outside of that, from a financial standpoint, there's tons of different things that can help you financially get through college and get to college. Parents shouldn't think that the burden is all on their own to send you to college, keep you in college and buy your books and all that. There's a lot of help that's out there and a lot of that comes from you too. A lot of it comes from your academic achievements. The higher you score on your academic efforts, the easier it is to get financial aid. So you're helping to pay part of your college just from your performance. It's not just the parents. I think the parents have a large role in it. I think I look at it from a strictly dollar and cent standpoint. If you look at it that way, it's an investment. Your parents. Getting you to college and getting you through college is an investment for your future. And if there's one thing that parents want for their kids, it's for them to be successful. And whatever you do, whatever you choose to go to college, for whatever you choose to do in life afterwards, even if you choose not to go to college, mommy and daddy want you to be successful and we want you to be happy, and you know success lends itself to happiness. So it's an investment there. But it's also the community who helped to build you into that person that makes you successful. We can't take credit for it. The majority of the effort comes from your part, but there's a lot of guidance, there's a lot of help along the way. Some of that comes from friends, it comes from your peers, it comes from mentors that you're going to be associated with. You know you're taking a trip to Japan. That trip to Japan, very few kids are going to take that trip before they get out of high school. You're going to learn a ton, not just about Japan, but about life. You're going to learn about travel. You're going to learn about finance. You've already learned about finance because you've had to finance a portion of that trip. All these things are what get you to college, and I'm not just talking financially, I'm talking knowledge, wise, and these are things that are going to serve you through college and, after college, through life. So no, it's not just the parents. There's a lot of factors that go into your success, moving forward, not the least of which is your own.

Speaker 2:

All right, fair enough, you get the big one. Mommy, no boy. So let's get this one out of the way. It's covered. It's caught and I'm already flubbing it. Great. Is college inherently necessary for someone to live a successful life?

Speaker 3:

No, Okay, moving around a lot.

Speaker 1:

Hey, college is not for everybody. That's it's while it's. You know, again, back in the day you had the people that went to college and the people that didn't, and depending on what your test scores were, you were either a college prep or you weren't. That was how it was back, you know, when I was in school, depending on what your grades were, oh, you're going to college, okay, or okay. So if you're not going to college, then what are you doing? Are you going into the military or are you going and working at the gas station? It was, you know, almost like an insult to the person that didn't go to college. And sometimes the person wasn't going to college because of financial reasons, because it was just too expensive to do that. So if it's, you have to want to do it. You know there are kids that their parents tell them you're going to college, whether you like it or not, and then that kid ends up in college for 10 years because they go to school and they don't know what they want to major in. So they major in one thing and they do that for a couple of years and they don't like that and they move on to something else and you get that professional student where they just keep getting more and more degrees because they don't want to go into the real world. They just rather stay. I think nowadays there's so many technical schools out there where that might be better suited for you know, for a student or for a child to go into that aspect. You have to do what you want to do. If it's something where you want to be in the medical field, you want to work in that, then you have to go to college. Unless you want to be a medical tech, then you would go to, you know, a technical school that deals with that. You know you want to be a lawyer, well, you have to go to law school. Then you have to go to college. Depending on what it is that you want to do, then there's a certain path that you have to follow. If it's something where you're not sure, should you still go to college, well, maybe maybe that's where you decide to kind of stay more local. Maybe you decide to go for an associate's degree where you go to a community college and kind of test the waters and see what it is that you like, and that's where I think nowadays high school has kind of become almost that precursor to having these choice schools and having these academies or these majors that you can have in high school, where you can kind of test the waters and see, ooh, do I want to do a career in music, do I want to do a career in nursing, do I want to do a career in business? And you start taking these classes and you realize, wow, I really hate this.

Speaker 3:

Or do you want to do a career in truck driving?

Speaker 1:

Or do you want to be a truck driver? That's a noble career as well. You have to do what makes you comfortable, like Daddy said, what makes you happy, where you feel you're going to be successful and success is based on what you feel. You might only make $50,000 a year, but you're completely happy where you could be making $100,000 a year and you're completely miserable. It's all a matter of perspective. So you have to do what makes you happy. Maybe working in that corporate environment makes you absolutely miserable, so you don't want to do it. But working in a clinic, a veterinary clinic or something as a technician, makes you happy. You're not making as much money, but you're happy. You go home at the end of the day feeling fulfilled. That's what you have to figure out what will make you happy, what do you feel will be successful and what path do you need to get there? Is it college? Is it engineering? Is it music? Is it art? Is it computer science? What is it that brings you joy? That's really the main thing that you have to look at and then just go from there. All right.

Speaker 2:

I'm not going to ask you if college is right for me. We're not going to go down that path today. Yes, you are going to college, whether you like it or not.

Speaker 1:

No, seriously, we've had this discussion. We had the precursor to this discussion when it came to national honor society. I'm just saying this is where we talked about it and you were very adamant that you didn't want to do it. You probably could have gotten in if you had applied and you were asked to apply. You got the invitation to apply and you chose not to. That was your decision.

Speaker 3:

We did negotiate at least two years of college Right, just for the record.

Speaker 1:

Right. We did say and that's because we felt, because of where your grades are, we know you're going to get into a four-year school. There's no question about it. That's. The other thing, too is nowadays there's a college out there for everybody. Now you can go.

Speaker 3:

Even truck drivers.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm sure there is. I wouldn't be surprised. You can go anywhere in the country, anywhere in the world, and there is a college available. If you want to do a virtual school, there are tons of virtual schools out there. If you never want to set foot on a campus somewhere, you still have the ability to take classes and get a degree because, again, the world has changed in the last 10, 15 years and it's so much more accessible to do that. If it's something where we start visiting colleges and there's nothing that sparks any sort of joy in you, where you're like nope, nope, nope, nope, we're not going to force you to go to Pennsylvania, to go to North Jersey, to go to Delaware, to go to Virginia, to go to Florida for school, that's where we had said well then, stay local and at least get that associate's degree, and then let's see where you are. This way you can say you know what, I tried it, I did it. What have we always said growing up? At least try something once and if you don't like it, you never have to do it again. That's where we've decided with college and that might be a conversation that other kids need to have with their parents, because their parents might be setting these grand expectations for their kids when, if they just actually sat and had the conversation with their child, they'd realize that's not what I want to go and do. I want to do this and then everybody's happy that way.

Speaker 2:

Alrighty.

Speaker 3:

Alrighty, you look very happy now Okay.

Speaker 2:

Hopefully this one will be. This is the last question we've got and honestly, I think it's set up right for you to answer it. Personal one again how do you help provide me with my educational needs?

Speaker 3:

I do absolutely nothing.

Speaker 2:

And like it.

Speaker 3:

And like it. No encouragement, and I think that's the biggest thing Be there for your kids. We study a lot. We try to find the best study technique that works for you and we'll try one way. If you don't get the scores you want, we'll try a different way. And, you know, try to get you excited. I try to get you interested in things. I think when you're interested in the subjects that you have and granted the period in history that you're doing right now, it's very difficult to get interested in. You have to have some vested interest in it and one of the things I try to do is make it interesting, make it fun. You know we study for your chemistry. We try to make that fun. You know I'll find videos that show a little bit extra or give you a little bit more background on some of the historic stuff that we do. I won't touch math with a 10 foot pole, though. That's not my area of expertise. So that's all you.

Speaker 2:

We figured that out.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, what do I do? I try to make it interesting. I try to keep you, you know, focused on it. I try to not make it a grind, and I think a lot of kids run into the situation where school can be a grind. It gets boring, it's topics you don't want to talk about and I think if parents can peek their kids' interests can first of all notice that kids are zoning out or that they're not interested in what they're talking about. And encourage your kids. I think that's the biggest thing. You know, my parents are very hands off when it came to school, unless I brought home bad grades and then they yelled at me, and I think that's the wrong approach. Parents need to get involved with their kids before there's a need to yell at them, because if there's a need to yell at your kids, it's probably because you haven't been involved with them. So get involved with them, encourage them and try to make it a little bit more entertaining. That's all I got.

Speaker 2:

All right, that's fair. That's all we had for today, so did you want to do a quick break, and then we'll come back with Closing Remarktion.

Speaker 3:

You got it, here we go.

Speaker 2:

All right, so this was the end of our supposed to be one episode segment on top challenges parenting. We were estimated how long the answers were specifically, but parenting is really hard.

Speaker 3:

We had to do a number of set and number of episodes.

Speaker 2:

But hey, you know, I think we got the most out of it because you know we were still able to get to everything. So now we can get into some of the more interesting topics outside of this for our next ones, although that's going to be obviously a while from here. Thank you both for joining me.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for having me too.

Speaker 2:

No problem.

Speaker 3:

Now that I know my 12 names.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that was fun. So you know, thank you for joining us. And before we go completely, I'd like to give us a bit of start our show plugs. So, when it comes to our subscriptions, you can find us on Apple podcast, spotify, google Stitcher, iheartradio, tune in and really anywhere you can get a podcast. You can email us at comments at insightsandthethingscom. We're on Twitter or X, whatever you really go by at this point, at insights underscore things. We have high res videos on YouTube at youtubecom slash insights, and the things. We stream five days a week on Twitch at twitchtv slash insights and the things. You can find audio versions of this podcast listed as podcastinsightsandthethingscom. We're on Facebook at facebookcom slash insights and things podcast. We're on Instagram at instagramcom slash insights and the things, and you can find links to all these and more on our official website at wwwinsightsandthethingscom. And that is it.

Speaker 3:

That's it, another one of the books.

Speaker 2:

Bye everyone.

Speaker 3:

Bye.

Speaker 2:

Bye, bye.

Insights Into Parenting and Socializing
Importance of Socializing for Homeschooled Kids
Parental Influence on Child's Social Life
Instilling Good Behavior in Children
Responsibility of Parents in Teaching Behavior
Parental Example and Educational Needs
Parents' Role vs Schools' Role
Preparing Students for Real World
College and Happiness in Education