Insights Into Teens

Insights Into Teens: Episode 184 "Helping Teens Avoid FOMO"

December 04, 2023 Madison and Joseph Whalen Season 5 Episode 184
Insights Into Teens: Episode 184 "Helping Teens Avoid FOMO"
Insights Into Teens
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Insights Into Teens
Insights Into Teens: Episode 184 "Helping Teens Avoid FOMO"
Dec 04, 2023 Season 5 Episode 184
Madison and Joseph Whalen

Ever wondered why you feel an undeniable pull to check social media, only to feel unsatisfied, disconnected, and like you're missing out? Our teenage years are already full of challenges, and this digital age has added a whole new layer of complexity. Join us, Joseph and Madison Whalen, as we strip back the glossy veneer of social media and dive into the phenomenon of FOMO, or the fear of missing out, which is having a profound impact on teenagers today.

Not only do we share the unsettling ways FOMO influences teens' mental health, causing anxiety, depression, and disrupted sleep patterns, but we also guide you through strategies to fight it. From limiting social media usage to maintaining a gratitude journal, volunteering, spending time outdoors, and seeking professional help when needed, we reveal tools that could potentially help teens navigate these treacherous waters. The digital world is here to stay, but with awareness and action, we can help our teens turn the tide on FOMO and steer towards healthier, happier lives. Tune in to explore this critical issue and gain some valuable insights.

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered why you feel an undeniable pull to check social media, only to feel unsatisfied, disconnected, and like you're missing out? Our teenage years are already full of challenges, and this digital age has added a whole new layer of complexity. Join us, Joseph and Madison Whalen, as we strip back the glossy veneer of social media and dive into the phenomenon of FOMO, or the fear of missing out, which is having a profound impact on teenagers today.

Not only do we share the unsettling ways FOMO influences teens' mental health, causing anxiety, depression, and disrupted sleep patterns, but we also guide you through strategies to fight it. From limiting social media usage to maintaining a gratitude journal, volunteering, spending time outdoors, and seeking professional help when needed, we reveal tools that could potentially help teens navigate these treacherous waters. The digital world is here to stay, but with awareness and action, we can help our teens turn the tide on FOMO and steer towards healthier, happier lives. Tune in to explore this critical issue and gain some valuable insights.

No Credits Rolled, where we play the games you love but rarely finish them!

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

An original podcast by a husband and wife team of self professed pop-culture geeks. It is a discussion about all things entertainment from movies and music to television and pop culture. We examine some of the more obscure aspects of the entertainment industry.

Create Harmony

This is a podcast about setting an intentional rhythm, savoring life’s blessings and...

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Speaker 1:

Insightful Podcasts by Informative Hosts. Insights into Things a podcast network. Welcome to Insights into Teens, a podcast series exploring the issues and challenges of today's youth. Your hosts are Joseph and Madison Whalen, a father and daughter team making their way through the challenges of the teenage years.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to Insights into Teens. This is episode 184, helping Teens Avoid FOMO or Fear of Missing Out. I'm your host, joseph Whalen, and my active and involved co-host, madison Whalen.

Speaker 3:

Hi everyone, interesting adjectives for today.

Speaker 2:

Are you active and involved or no?

Speaker 3:

Probably not today, but you know, not so much, huh.

Speaker 2:

Well, I know you're not feeling so good today. How was the rest of the week so far for you, though?

Speaker 3:

Not terrible, I guess.

Speaker 2:

That's good, I guess.

Speaker 3:

I mean, you know, just trying to get back into the swing of things after Thanksgiving break.

Speaker 2:

so Anything exciting. I know you missed a few quizzes today because of absent teachers.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we're going to be doing all that tomorrow, so fun.

Speaker 2:

Right. So one exciting thing we did have to report. Today we just got the first sample in here, a piece of original artwork that you did. That was let me see the cup here. So this was original artwork that you did for Boulder's Gate, because we've been playing the game quite religiously now.

Speaker 3:

Yep.

Speaker 2:

And we just got some new. What are these Tumblers or mugs or what are these things?

Speaker 3:

called. Well, they're not mugs. I'm assuming they're called tumblers.

Speaker 2:

Tumblers. Maybe they're tumblers. Anyway, you too can own a custom Boulder's Gate piece of artwork from Madison. We can get you these tumblers for $20 each. If you want those, Just write in and let us know. But it's got all the main characters, what your companion characters, it's got the pets and it's got a nice little blank space there so you can even color your own, your own tab, whatever your custom character is. Anyway, it was worthwhile. I think we had to plug it just because it was really cool, because I like it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Anyway, enough of these sales pitch. So FOMO, which stands for fear of missing out, is a common issue among teenagers that can lead to feelings of isolation. It goes beyond the concern of missing a specific event and instead involves an ongoing fear of being excluded. Adolescents experiencing FOMO often believe that enjoyable and exciting activities are happening elsewhere without their involvement. On today's episode of Insights into Things, Insights into Teens they're technically both the same thing, because everything falls on their Insights into Things.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Disclaimer there we're going to talk about FOMO, how it affects teens and how to help teens, not teams. How to help teens. There could be teams of teens. How to combat this very real issue.

Speaker 3:

And we're already making up words or not making up words, going off script.

Speaker 2:

It's a very fluid script that we have today.

Speaker 3:

Pretty much.

Speaker 2:

Before we do that, though, I do want to put another plug in there for the podcast itself. I would invite our listening and viewing audience out there to subscribe to the podcast. You can find audio versions of this podcast listed as Insights into Teens, or you can find audio and video versions of all the networks podcast listed as Insights into Things Pretty much anywhere you get a podcast these days. I would also invite you to write in, give us your feedback, tell us whether or not you like our mugs and give us suggestions for show topics. We are available at comments at insights into thingscom for email. You can hit us on Twitter at insights underscore things, or X, or whatever Elon's calling it this week. You can also find all these links and more on our official website at wwwinsightsintothingscom. Shall we get started? Sure, here we go.

Speaker 2:

So our friends at Newport Academy once again enlighten us for today's topic. So fear of missing out is a term that encapsulates a prevalent psychological phenomenon in today's digital era, especially in the context of social media and smartphone usage. This concept, while addressing a long existing human emotion, has gained significant relevance in contemporary society, as evidenced by its addition to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2013. This inclusion marks a recognition of how its growing impact in the modern digitally connected world has had an effect on everyone.

Speaker 3:

The emergence and I'm not even going to try that one Proliferation of social media platforms have profoundly influenced how teenagers perceive and engage with their social environments. Platforms like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat offer a continuous stream of updates and images from peers and acquaintances. These posts often depict the most enjoyable and exciting moments of people's lives, focusing heavily on positive and enviable experiences. This phenomenon leads to a distorted perception of reality among adolescents, who are regularly exposed to these highly curated and selective poor trails of others lives.

Speaker 2:

The constant exposure to idealized representations on social media can make teenagers feel that their own lives are comparatively dull or unfulfilling. The contrast between the exciting lives they perceive online and their own daily experiences can create a sense of dissatisfaction or longing. This is particularly impactful during adolescence, a time when social belonging and peer perception are highly emphasized. The disparity between the online world's highlights and their own reality can intensify feelings of FOMO, leading teenagers to believe they're missing out on experiences that everyone else seems to be enjoying.

Speaker 3:

FOMO, therefore, is not just about the fear of missing out on adventure experiences, but extends to a deeper concern about social belonging, self-esteem and personal fulfillment in comparison to others. It underscores the psychological impact of social media on young individuals, shaping their understanding of social norms and expectations. This digitalized phenomenon calls for increased awareness and strategies to mitigate its negative effects on the well-being of adolescents.

Speaker 2:

Sure, missing out is particularly acute among teenagers, who tend to be avid users of social media except for you, of course. This demographic's engagement with platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat is not only frequent, but often takes on a compulsive quality. Studies have shown a correlation between high levels of FOMO and intense social media usage. Teens typically check their social media feeds as one of the first activities in the morning, the last before sleeping and even during meals. This pattern suggests a deep-seated need to stay connected, driven by the fear of missing out on something important or exciting happening in their social circles.

Speaker 3:

The impact of FOMO is not conferred in the you should stretch before we have these things.

Speaker 2:

Maybe that's what it is, yeah.

Speaker 3:

The impact of FOMO is not confined to digital interactions, but spills over into the physical world, influencing behavior and mental focus. Teenagers experiencing FOMO may find it difficult to concentrate on daily tasks such as driving or attending classes. The constant pull to check social media updates can lead to distracted driving, a hazardous behavior that endangers not only the teen. Sorry. The constant pull to check social media updates can lead to distracted driving, a hazardous behavior that engages not only the teen drivers but also others on the road. In educational settings, the distraction can diminish their ability to engage with and absorb critical learning materials, impacting their academic performance.

Speaker 2:

The pervasive nature of social media exacerbates FOMO, as these platforms are designed to showcase a polished, idealized version of life. Constant exposure to such portrayals can foster feelings of inadequacy and isolation among teens, as they compare their everyday lives to the highlight reels of their peers. The comparison can create a sense of being left out or falling behind, which, in turn, can impact their self-esteem and overall emotional well-being.

Speaker 3:

Addressing and managing FOMO is crucial for the mental health of teenagers in today's digital world. It involves cultivating an understanding of the curated nature of social media content and developing strategies to balance online engagement with real-world experiences. Encouraging healthy digital habits, promoting real-life interactions and fostering an environment where teenagers can discuss and navigate these challenges are essential steps in mitigating the negative effects of FOMO. This approach can help teens build resilience against the pressures of social media and support their emotional and physiological health in a hyper-connected age.

Speaker 2:

So let me make an interesting point here, drawing the parallels between FOMO and social media, in that what we see on social media really is not an accurate representation of reality. It really is a highlight reel. I think that's a great way to describe it. How do you and I know you don't regularly use social media, but how would you differentiate the highlight reels that people put up there for their statuses and what they're doing and their influencer stuff and all that stuff? How do you differentiate that from reality and what their lives really are like?

Speaker 3:

Well, a lot of times I find it kind of easy because when it comes to certain influencers, a lot of the times they kind of make humor out of their lives. I always know that when it comes to humor it can usually be pretty exaggerated. So I'm usually able to kind of differentiate between that where it's like someone does something overly extreme and it's like oh, that was kind of for comedic effect or just to make someone laugh or try to poke fun at something.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I guess that makes sense. I mean, as long as there's a grounded understanding in reality that what you're seeing online is not really what life is. It's almost like watching reality TV and expecting it to represent actual real life. Reality TV has nothing to do with reality, and I think social media is the same thing. So if people are formulating opinions of themselves in their own lives based on that, that's kind of dangerous ground there. In what ways do you suffer from FOMO? Do you suffer from FOMO? I know you're not a particularly social person. You don't have these grand circles of people that you hang out with on a regular basis. Is FOMO an issue for you?

Speaker 3:

It certainly can be. I'll be honest because, like granted, while I don't have it in relation to social media as much as you know, some teens would, I do have it when it comes to just being around other people, because I can see that they're like at lunch, they're like groups of friends that hang out with each other and that, you know, talk and are able to, you know, crack jokes with each other. Meanwhile, I'm kind of sitting alone, you know, doing my own work. I'm fine with sitting alone, but it's like you know, sometimes it'd be nice to have a group of friends to hang out with at lunch.

Speaker 2:

Right, I understand that. Do you notice people in your class or people in your age range? Are they as hooked on social media and have this burning need to be updated on a regular basis, like the article seems to suggest?

Speaker 3:

I mean, yeah, you know, there's a lot of kids that I know in my school who are either on their phones for, like you know, trying to check out what's been going on, or they're on their phone to play some sort of game, or they use their phone to talk to, you know, their friends. Now, obviously I don't really know if all of them are like, if it's always social media, but I do know it's kind of something that, like, a decent amount of people in my school are known for.

Speaker 2:

Okay, have you ever felt the need or the pressure to make your life seem more exciting for other people? Are you trying like, if you're trying to impress somebody or something where we're having a very positive looking social media feed would kind of feed into that? Have you ever been in a situation like that?

Speaker 3:

I don't think I've ever really been in a situation where I've, like tried to make my life seem better than it is, at least in like my average everyday life, because, like the people that know my average everyday life, I don't feel like I need to impress, and when it comes to other people, I really don't even share much about that. So as someone that really doesn't talk to people or really try to engage with anybody that I don't already know, I don't think I really had that issue.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I mean, not being on social media certainly helps. I'm sure that's part of it. But the fact that you don't even have a need to try to impress people and the fact that your friends don't have that expectation is really a testament to you and to your friends and to the character that you look for in friends. I think it's a compliment to you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, really, what happens is it's just like I leave stuff out. It's not that I, like, try to exaggerate certain things, it's just like some more personal aspects about my life. It's like I don't always tell all my friends, so that's the only thing I can think of really that makes sense.

Speaker 2:

All right, I think we're going to take a quick break and when we come back you can tell us how FOMO impacts mental health. Sure, we'll be right back. For over seven years, the Second Sith Empire has been the premier community guild in the online game Star Wars the Old Republic, with hundreds of friendly and helpful active members, a weekly schedule of nightly events, annual guild meet and greets and an active community both on the web and on Discord. The Second Sith Empire is more than your typical gaming group. We're family. Join us on the StarForge server for nightly events such as operations, flashpoints, world Boss Hunts, star Wars Trivia, guild Lottery and much more. Visit us on the web today at wwwthesecantsefempirecom.

Speaker 3:

Welcome back to Insights and the Teens. Today, we're talking about helping teens avoid FOMO. Now we're going to talk about how FOMO impacts mental health. The impact of FOMO, or fear of missing out, on adolescent mental health in the digital age is a growing concern, especially given the ubiquity of social media. Fomo, while not a classified mental health condition, can contribute to increased feelings of anxiety and depression among teens, often leading to detrimental effects on their overall well-being. Studies have shown that teenagers who experience high levels of FOMO often report lower life satisfaction and more frequent negative moods. This link is particularly evident in the way FOMO interacts with social media usage, creating a cycle that can lead to stress, disrupted sleep patterns and an overall increase in negative emotion.

Speaker 2:

One insightful study involving college freshmen used daily diaries and questionnaires to explore the participants' well-being and life satisfaction, revealing several crucial aspects of how FOMO affects adolescents. The timing and occurrence of FOMO were noted to vary throughout the day, with an increase later in the day and towards the end of the week. This pattern suggests that the anticipation of missing out on social events or activities grows as the weekend a prime time for socializing draws near. Importantly, fomo is not confined to any specific personality type. It affects a wide range of individuals, including both introverted and extroverted teens. This broad impact highlights FOMO's pervasive nature in the adolescent experience.

Speaker 3:

Another key finding is the impact of FOMO on everyday activities. Teens often feel heightened levels of FOMO when they are engaged in necessary activities like studying or working, as they might perceive these responsibilities as barriers to participating in desirable social events. This conflict between obligation and the desire to be socially involved can exacerbate feelings of FOMO.

Speaker 2:

The study also revealed that FOMO can lead to significant negative outcomes and not only triggers negative emotions but also serves as a major distraction. Adolescents preoccupied with what they might be missing out on can experience considerable emotional turmoil. This preoccupation can detract from the inability to enjoy present moments and engage fully in their current activities. Understanding and addressing the impact of FOMO is therefore crucial for supporting the mental health and emotional development of adolescents in our increasingly digital world.

Speaker 3:

The correlation between FOMO and spending behaviors, particularly among millennials, sheds light on its broader societal implications. A recent study revealed that a significant portion of millennials nearly 40% have incurred expenses beyond their financial capacity, motivated by the urge to keep pace with their peers. This trend reflects how FOMO influences spending choices, pushing individuals towards purchasing experiences, events and material goods to counteract the feeling of being left out. This phenomenon is especially pronounced in the Millennial Demographic, driven by a sense that others' accomplishments or experiences are in some way a loss to them, highlighting a competitive aspect of social comparison.

Speaker 2:

The impact of social media on mental health is significantly magnified by the phenomenon of FOMO. By today's digital age, the urge to remain continuously connected and keep up with peers can lead to increased levels of anxiety, stress and dissatisfaction. This persistent state of mental strain is not just an individual concern, but also a societal one, emphasizing the need for parents, caregivers and the community to understand and address these dynamics.

Speaker 3:

Understanding how FOMO influences young people's financial decisions and mental well-being is crucial. It's not only about the immediate feelings of missing out, but also about the long-term effects on life satisfaction and emotional health. Young individuals, consistently bombarded with images and updates from their peers, can develop a distorted view of what is normal or desirable, leading them to make financial choices that are unsustainable or detrimental to their long-term goals.

Speaker 2:

To counteract these effects, it's imperative to develop and implement effective strategies that encourage healthier social media habits. This involves educating teams about the curated nature of social media content, promoting a balanced digital diet and fostering open conversations about the emotional impact of online interactions. Encouraging activities that are offline and focusing on personal interests and skills can also help to build a sense of self-worth that is not reliant on social validation.

Speaker 3:

Cultivating emotional and psychological resilience is key. This can be achieved through developing coping strategies for managing anxiety, stress and dissatisfaction. Teaching young people mindfulness, digital literacy and critical thinking skills can empower them to navigate the complexities of a digitally dominated world with greater confidence and well-being.

Speaker 2:

Building the pervasive effects of FOMO in the context of social media requires a concerted effort from all stakeholders in society. By fostering awareness, promoting healthy habits and building resilience, we can support the younger generation in achieving a more balanced and satisfying digital and real life experience. Now it's worth noting that was a lot of material that we went through there and a lot of it's sort of kind of nags on social media. This is not a problem that is caused by social media. It is not unique to social media, nor is it solved by getting off of social media.

Speaker 2:

Fear of missing out is a legitimate emotional feeling that has long existed, well before even the internet was around, I could say as a young teen I fell victim to this numerous times. They make a point of saying that it happens a lot on the weekends. There's not a lot of socialization that happens for teenagers during the week on their normal circumstances. Most of that dances or go to a mall or movies or hanging out with friends. Most of that happens on the weekend. It's usually when most of this sort of creeps up. For me it was funny because I found that back when I was your age, the internet didn't exist. Yes, that's how old.

Speaker 1:

I am.

Speaker 2:

We had BBS's bulletin board services where you dial into computers over the phone line, and that was essentially what social media was for us. Back then I found there were times that when you tried to do that and get online with other people, you couldn't because the phone would be busy. I found that's where I had my fear of missing out. When I couldn't get online, I couldn't get to these social areas that I would hang out with friends. That's when I would feel it. Have you ever experienced a fear of missing out under any circumstance?

Speaker 3:

I guess the thing is when I came to the school dances. I know for a while a lot of my friends have been wanting me to go to the school dances. I only ever really went to one and that was kind of an informal dance. Ever since sixth grade I haven't gone to another one. I know a lot of my friends particularly one is very keen on me trying to go to another one of the dances. I guess there was certainly a I don't want to let them down sort of thing, but it wasn't enough to make me go to the dance.

Speaker 2:

Nice. Okay, if you don't really experience FOMO the way it's defined here, have you ever been in situations where maybe you felt left out of something and that might be contributing to this?

Speaker 3:

I mean, yeah, something I can say that I it's not as big, but certain social trends that people like let's just say buzzwords, I guess there's words that they're slang that people my age use and use it on a daily basis For a while I'm like what the heck does that mean? I don't get it. I'll kind of feel left out in that way, or left out in the new social trend of like oh, there's this thing that everybody really likes and everyone's really into it. I'm like what is this?

Speaker 2:

Right, I got you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I guess in a way, I feel that's kind of where I kind of feel left out. It's not like an extreme thing, but it's still like okay, I really don't get this.

Speaker 2:

I got you, so you're not addicted or married to your social media, but you still keep up with your friends. What are some of the methods that you typically use to keep in touch with your friends and keep up on things?

Speaker 3:

Just texting saying hey, how you're doing occasionally calling, and then what some of them might have been hanging out with them.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

So, ironically enough, it's more traditional methods that you have Granted. Texting is not traditional, but texting is kind of the equivalent of a phone call these days, since most people who have cell phones don't actually know you can actually talk to people on them. They use it for everything but phone conversations. So in situations like that have you found yourself trying to get a hold of a friend and that friend's just not available and you don't know why they're not available and you may feel that FOMO feeling, even for a brief period of time there. Has that ever happened?

Speaker 3:

I mean, yeah, there've been instances where I've wanted to talk to a friend and they don't respond back. Most of the time it's not like I'm scared, I'm being left out, it's like, oh my God, what happened to them?

Speaker 2:

Right, so it's a concern for them at that point. So anytime that you it sounds like I don't want to put words in your mouth you can correct me if I'm wrong but it sounds like anytime that you've had these feelings of perhaps being left out, it hasn't had a dramatic traumatic effect on you.

Speaker 3:

Not really.

Speaker 2:

You know, your self-esteem hasn't been affected by it. You just, it's kind of like water off the back of a duck. You just sort of roll with it. It sounds like.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, myself I ruin my own self-esteem. I don't.

Speaker 2:

I don't need any help with that, okay, well, that's another podcast we're going to have to revisit, I think.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So we're going to take another break and when we come back we'll talk about how to overcome FOMO. Even if you don't have it, We'll be right back.

Speaker 1:

Headlights sides into entertainment a podcast series taking a deeper look into entertainment and media. Our husband and wife team of pop culture fanatics are exploring all things, from music and movies to television and fandom. We'll look at the interesting and obscure entertainment news of the week. We'll talk about theme park and pop culture news. We'll give you the latest and greatest on pop culture conventions. We'll give you a deep dive into Disney, star Wars and much more. Check out our video episodes at youtubecom backslash Insights into Things, or audio episodes at podcastinsightsintoentertainmentcom, or check us out on the web at insightsintothingscom.

Speaker 3:

Welcome back to Insights into Teens. Today we're talking about helping teens avoid FOMO, and now we're going to talk about how to overcome FOMO. The strategy of limiting social media usage to combat FOMO, particularly among teenagers, has been increasingly recognized as a way to enhance mental well-being. A notable study titled no More FOMO explored the effects of reducing social media entanglement on emotional and physiological health, offering insights into the benefits of disconnecting from these platforms.

Speaker 2:

The study involved 143 undergraduate students from the University of Pennsylvania. Initially, researchers assessed the participants' usual social media habits, focusing on their engagement with platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. This initial phase provided a baseline understanding of their typical online behaviors.

Speaker 3:

Students were split into two groups. One group was instructed to limit their social media use to just 10 minutes per platform each day, while the other group continued their normal usage patterns. After three weeks, the results of the study were revealing. The group that altered to the 10-minute limit experienced a significant decrease in feelings of loneliness and depression compared to the control group. This finding suggests that actively reducing time spent on social media can lead to notable improvement on emotional well-being.

Speaker 2:

Participants in both groups became conscious of the impact of their social media interactions. This heightened awareness points to the benefits of mindful engagement with digital platforms, indicating that a more thoughtful approach to social media can enhance emotional health. Interestingly, both groups, including those who didn't change their social media usage, showed reductions in anxiety and FOMO during the study. The outcome implies that simply being more mindful and aware of social media use, even without imposing strict limits, can have a positive effect.

Speaker 3:

The study's conclusion advocates for restricting social media use to about 30 minutes per day, suggesting that this can lead to significant improvement in overall well-being. The findings reinforce the idea that balancing connectivity with healthy technological boundaries is crucial for maintaining good mental health. This approach highlights the importance of managing digital interactions in a way that supports rather than detracts from emotional and physiological health.

Speaker 2:

So, obviously, all of those techniques to overcome this kind of center and revolve around the premise that social media is a major contributor. We already acknowledged the fact that it's a contributor, but it's not the only factor, so there's a number of other techniques that we can talk about. Addressing an overcoming FOMO involves more than just reducing social media use. It requires understanding its root causes and actively engaging in positive strategies to enhance well-being. This means acknowledging that the issue isn't solely the fault of social media. Instead of getting caught in the trap of constant comparisons with others, teens can adapt several effective approaches to better manage FOMO.

Speaker 3:

Encouraging teens to maintain a gratitude journal or a positivity notebook helps them focus on the positive aspects of their lives. This practice of reflection and appreciation can bolster self-esteem and diminish the sense of missing out on something supposedly better. Another beneficial activity is volunteering, which allows teens to contribute positively to their community. This not only provides valuable social interactions outside the digital realm, but also instills a sense of purpose and connection to a logical Spending time outdoors is another crucial strategy.

Speaker 2:

You know you and I love to do that. Being in nature, away from technology, offers a respite for the nervous system and can mitigate the negative effects of FOMO. Physical activities and the calming influence of natural surroundings positively impact mental health. Building authentic connections with peers is also vital. Strong, understanding and caring friendships can significantly reduce the emotional stress associated with FOMO.

Speaker 3:

Pursuing passions, be it through creative activities or hobbies, is also instrumental in combating FOMO. Engaging in activities that teens are passionate about can enhance their self-esteem and provide a sense of achievement, counteracting the feelings of inadequacy often fueled by FOMO. Lastly, it's important to recognize when FOMO becomes overwhelming. If a teen struggles to detach from their phone and this behavior interferes with their daily life, it may indicate underlying mental health issues, such as depression or anxiety. In such cases, seeking help from mental health professionals is crucial. Early identification and intervention can effectively address these concerns.

Speaker 2:

Overcoming FOMO involves a multifaceted approach that empowers teens to appreciate their lives, engage in fulfilling activities, nurture real-life relationships and seek professional help when necessary. By focusing on these diverse strategies, teens can effectively lessen the impact of FOMO and improve their overall well-being. So I think throughout the discussion here we've kind of established the fact that you're not particularly susceptible to FOMO. Do you have any friends that you think may be going through some of the things that we talked about here, that some of these techniques might actually help?

Speaker 3:

I mean, yeah, probably I might not know them off the top of my head or know which friends would probably be more susceptible to it than others, but yeah, I do believe that some of my friends are probably dealing with something like this and hopefully, you know, if you know I had to bring this up to them they'll be able to, it'll be able to help, right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean it might be one of those things where you just never talk about it and they don't even realize they might be going through it. So do you do any of the techniques that they talked about here, or gratitude journal or and they don't engage in outdoor activities a lot, but pursue hobbies and stuff like that? Probably, given the artwork that we have on the cup that we have now, we know you do pursue hobbies. Do you find solace in any of these types of things?

Speaker 3:

Well, keeping a gratitude journal, I don't really do that. I remember I tried doing something like that and then it was just I stopped.

Speaker 2:

It wasn't very gratifying yeah.

Speaker 3:

So you know, that's not really something that connects with me as much, Maybe if I actually put in the effort. But you know, volunteering. I want to volunteer at some point. I haven't yet. I'm working on that.

Speaker 2:

That's up there with the gratitude journal.

Speaker 3:

I was spending time outdoors. Obviously, I don't do that Building connections with my peers. I've technically been doing that with specific peers, but you know peers nonetheless.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 3:

Pursuing passions. Clearly that's probably one of the biggest ones, so pursuing passions certainly resonates with me. So, yeah, I guess the last two are really Okay.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's good to see that some of these things are activities that you engage in, because not only do they help with foam, but they help with a number of other emotional management type things that we have to deal with on a regular basis. So, in your experience, how important is it to have strong and real-life connections with your friends, and what are some of your techniques for establishing and maintaining those?

Speaker 3:

Oh, interesting that you're asking me that. I do think it's important to have at least someone that you can talk to.

Speaker 2:

Just one person.

Speaker 3:

It doesn't need to be, you know, an entire group of people. If it's an entire group of people, cool, if it's like one or two people cool. I do feel like having that support group is certainly good and I don't think anyone should feel you know less adequate if they don't have a huge group of friends over, like someone else that they know. So you know, just having at least somebody I feel is good.

Speaker 2:

Quality over quantity.

Speaker 3:

Yep.

Speaker 2:

That makes sense.

Speaker 3:

And for getting said friend and maintaining that relationship. I guess just be yourself and someone will probably come around and like you and enough to hang out with you. And in order to maintain that relationship, just keep up open communication and, again, continue to be yourself. Don't, you know, put on a mask for anybody. Don't pretend to be something you're not. I guess that's the best advice I can give, because I really don't. Well, I think that's sound advice.

Speaker 2:

I think being genuine is important and I think Fungo kind of lends to this genuine being genuine to yourself type thing. When people are more concerned about what other people think and they start acting and behaving and doing things for the benefit of others because they want to fit in, then they're really not being themselves and there's only so long that you can keep up that facade right. So you make friends with someone on false pretends, you have to pretend to be that false person whenever you're around that other person and I have to imagine that's just exhausting.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Right, because you're miserable and then the other person's going to think you're disingenuous at that point in time. So you're right, be yourself and you're going to find some people like you for who you are and some people won't. And we can't please everybody all the time, right.

Speaker 2:

So, be yourself, like yourself first. Once you like yourself, then you think you'll find other people are going to like you as well, and then you won't have to go through FOMO. You'll be in that social circle, yeah, so I think that kind of wraps it up for us today. We're going to take a quick break. Come back, we'll get your clothing clothing's tossed. Yeah, what do you think of clothing today? No, we'll get your closing thoughts and then finish up with the business of the podcast. We'll be right back.

Speaker 3:

All right. So to everybody out there, I just wanted to say that being able to connect with people in a way that's not artificial and also being genuine to yourself and the way that you want to live your life, I feel is very important. Obviously, FOMO doesn't isn't just an effect when it comes to things like social media. It's the fear of missing out. It's the fear of missing out on stuff that your friends can go through. It's the fear of missing out on stuff you see on social media. It's just the fear of not being able to accept your life as it is and appreciating what you have. So, really, all I'm going to say is that find value in your life and, even if it's not as grand as someone else's life or you think that you could be doing better or anything like that, I still think that appreciating the life that you have is good.

Speaker 2:

All right, I think they were sage words, as always. I think it's important to emphasize the one point that you made, and that's appreciation. Appreciate what you have and who you have. Don't covet what somebody else might have, because the perception that you have of what that other person's life is like probably is distorted. It's not reality. Everyone posts all these wonderful things on their social media that they're doing I'm going to this place and having fun with this person. You know they're not. They're not posting the negative stuff up there usually. So just remember you got to take it to good with the bad, but appreciate what you are, who you are and what you have, and work from there. I think that's it for the podcast today.

Speaker 2:

Before we go, I want to once again invite you to subscribe to the podcast. You can find audio versions of this podcast listed as insights into teens. You can find video and audio versions of all the networks podcast listed as insights into things we're. Anywhere you get a podcast these days Apple, spotify, google, et cetera. I would also encourage you to write in and give us your feedback, tell us what you think. You can email us at comments. At insights into thingscom, you'll find high res versions of all our videos on YouTube at youtubecom slash insights into things we do stream five days a week on Twitch at twitchtv slash insights into things. Or you can find links to all those and more on our website at wwwinsightsintothingscom and you.

Speaker 3:

And don't forget to check out our other two podcasts Insights and Entertainment, hosted by you and Sam now, and Insights and the Tomorrow, hosted by you and Mommy now.

Speaker 2:

Very good, that's it, another one in the books. Bye everyone.

Speaker 1:

Enjoy the rest of your day.

FOMO Among Teens
FOMO's Impact on Teens' Mental Health
(Cont.) FOMO's Impact on Teens' Mental Health
Combatting FOMO and Enhancing Well-Being